Magdala (Migdal)

Magdala was a major first-century port on the Sea of Galilee, a center of trade and commerce, and an exporter of salted fish to markets as far away as Europe. Archaeological discoveries early in the 21st century have made it a burgeoning pilgrimage destination.
Magdala’s fame down the centuries rested on one notable person, Mary Magdalene. 

This enigmatic woman — revered as a saint by the Orthodox, Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches — was one of the few persons named in the Gospels as being present at Christ’s crucifixion and the first recorded witness of His Resurrection. 
Whether she lived in Magdala or was simply born there is unknown, but she was apparently a wealthy woman. 
The city, on the western side of the Sea of Galilee between Tiberias and Capernaum, is mentioned only once in the New Testament.
The Jewish historian Josephus says Magdala had a population of 40,000 people and a fleet of 230 boats about 30 years after Jesus died. 

From the Scriptures:
The Gospel of Matthew (15:39) says Jesus went there by boat — but even this reference is uncertain, since some early manuscripts give the name as Magadan.